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AASB 13 and Prospective Application

Monday, August 11th, 2014

AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement is required to be applied prospectively for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013.

Questions have been raised about what prospective application means, the application has been illustrated below for a 30 June 2014 year end.

CURRENT YEAR FIGURES

30 June 2014

PRIOR YEAR FIGURES30 June 2013
Measurement of fair value in accordance with AASB 13

yes

All fair values reported in accordance with AASB 13

no

No restatement of reported fair value figures

Fair value disclosures in accordance with AASB 13

yes

AASB 13 disclosures required for all assets / liabilities recorded at fair value

no

No comparative disclosures required

Whilst neither disclosure nor restatements are required for comparative figures, all assets or liabilities recorded at fair value in the current year need to be determined in accordance with AASB 13 regardless of the date of valuation.

Valuations performed before the current reporting period
If a valuation (independent or directors) was performed prior to the start of the current reporting period (i.e. 1 July 2013 for 30 June 2014 reporting periods), then an entity will need to determine whether this valuation was performed in accordance with the AASB 13 methodology and whether the required AASB 13 disclosures can be provided.

Summary
There is no need for prior year restatements, however an entity needs to comply with AASB 13 in the current year and therefore disclosures and AASB 13 methodology are required for ALL assets and liabilities disclosed or measured at fair value at 30 June 2014.

For further information, please contact Carmen Ridley on cridley@afrs.com.au.

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AASB Meeting Report – July, by Carmen Ridley, AASB Board Member

Friday, August 8th, 2014

The AASB held their last meeting on 16 – 17 July and Carmen Ridley, AASB member provides an update on the most relevant areas to smaller, medium practices and entities.

  • IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers has been released by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and an education session was held for the AASB then the Board confirmed the disclosures required by entities preparing reduced disclosure requirement (RDR) financials under the Australian Accounting Standards.
  • Reporting entities – AASB staff are to meet with ASIC and Treasury staff in relation to amending the scope of AASB 101, 107, 108, 1048 and 1054 to apply to reporting entities / general purpose financial statements only
  • AASB 13 – clarification has been sought from the AASB about the use of the cost approach under AASB 13 for not-for-profit entities – this will be further discussed at the September meeting.

Further topics of discussion can be seen in AASB Action Alert. For questions or clarification on any matters, please contact Carmen Ridley via email: cridley@afrs.com.au.

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AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures – Clarification released

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Carmen Ridley (AASB Board Member & Principal, Australian Financial Reporting Solutions www.afrs.com.au) advises of a clarification to AASB 124 released by the AASB.

One of the changes in the accounting standards for 30 June 2014 has been the transfer of some of the key management personnel (KMP) disclosures from AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures to the Corporations Regulations for disclosing entities who are companies.

Some drafting anomalies in the Regulations has caused some confusion since the disclosure requirement appear to have been unintentionally expanded.

ASIC have released Class Order [CO 14/632] Key management personnel equity instrument disclosures to clarify the requirements in the Remuneration Report in relation to:

  •  equity instruments held by members of key management personnel or their close family members
  • certain transactions involving equity instruments between the disclosing entity and members of key management personnel or their close family members, and
  • options or rights over equity instruments held by key management personnel or their close family members.

The class order narrows the disclosure required by entities about equity instruments held by directors, other key management personnel and their close family members. Consistent with AASB 124, ASIC’s relief means that disclosures only need to be about equity instruments in the disclosing entity or its subsidiaries rather than every company they have an investment in. Entities that adopt the relief will be required to make the disclosures by class of the equity instrument, consistent with AASB 124.

The class order is applicable for financial years ending on or before 30 September 2014 as it is anticipated that the Corporations Regulations will be amended to correct the anomaly prior to that date.

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Don’t Forget the New Standards

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Carmen Ridley (AASB Board member & Principal, Australian Financial Reporting Solutions www.afrs.com.au) writes for CaseWare Australia & New Zealand.

I have just finished my round of financial reporting updates for 30 June 2014 and have to admit, I have been disappointed and a little scared about the lack of awareness of the new AASB’s which are effective for the first time this reporting period.

I will take this opportunity to remind finance teams and their auditors of the ‘headlines’ relating to the new / revised standards so further research can be undertaken to ensure that financial statements are in compliance with Australian Accounting Standards at 30 June 2014.

AASB 119 Employee Benefits

  • Significant changes to defined benefit plan accounting – removal of the corridor approach;
  • Changes to the definition of short-term benefits may cause discounting of annual leave liabilities.

Consolidation suite of standards (AASB 10 – 12)

Entities need to start with a ‘blank piece of paper’ and determine the classification of each investment held under the new control model.

Note: Not-for-profit entities are not required to apply the requirements of AASB 10 – 12 until annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014 (i.e. 30 June 2015 year ends).

AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements

  • Revised definition of control focussing more on the substance of the relationship and power rather than ownership percentage;
    • An entity controls another if:

it is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the investee.

  • Many entities previously classified as associates may now be subsidiaries and therefore consolidated;
  • Consider where you:
    • Are the largest shareholder (even though you own less than 50.1%)
    • Have delegated power (e.g. property trust)
    • Have arrangements in place where power does not reflect the ownership interest.

AASB 11 Joint Arrangements

  • Joint arrangements exist where two or more parties have joint control (granted through an agreement);
  • Joint arrangements are then classified as:
Type of arrangement Characteristics Accounting treatment
Joint operation Parties have rights to certain assets and obligations for certain liabilities Each party to the arrangement accounts for its share of assets and liabilities.
Joint venture Parties have rights to the net assets of the arrangement. Equity accounting.

 

AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities

 Disclosure requirements for interests in any of the following:

  • Subsidiaries
  • Associates
  • Joint arrangements
  • Unconsolidated structured entities

Disclosure requirements are extensive and include both qualitative and quantitative information.

AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement

  • New definition of fair value

“The price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.”

  • Robust methodology for determining fair value
  • New concepts to consider:
    • Market participants
    • Orderly transaction
    • Principal / most advantageous market
    • Highest and best use.
    • Significant number of additional disclosures required.
    • Prospective application, therefore no need to adjust comparatives.

Remember retrospective application

I started this article by talking about these standards being effective for the first time at 30 June 2014, however this does not take into account retrospective application.

Each of the standards discussed above, (with the exception of AASB 13) is accounted for as a mandatory change in accounting policy and applied as if it has always been in place.  This means that comparatives need to be changed and an opening balance sheet (statement of financial position) prepared.

This means significant information is needed to reflect the numbers under the new standards and if they are materially different from those previously presented, an audit of them will need to be required.

Further information / advice on any of these standards can be obtained from Carmen Ridley at cridley@afrs.com.au.

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Special Purpose Financial Statements – Cash Flows

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

(From Carmen Ridley – www.afrs.com.au)

I have a client who does not want to include a statement of cash flows in their special purpose financial statements, is there any requirement for them to do so?

AASB 107 Statement of Cash Flows is applicable to the following entities:

  • each entity that is required to prepare financial reports in accordance with Part 2M.3 of the Corporations Act;
  • general purpose financial statements of each reporting entity; and
  • financial statements that are, or are held out to be, general purpose financial statements.

This is a different application to many of the other accounting standards, since it is mandatory for all entities preparing financial statements under the Corporations Act regardless of whether they are general or special purpose.

In summary:

Company preparing special purpose financial statements under Part 2M of the Corporations Act 2001
Statement of cash flows is a mandatory primary statement.

Non-corporate entity preparing special purpose financial statements in accordance with legislation
Generally legislation would require compliance with Australian Accounting Standards which would mean at least preparation of the four primary statements.

Entity preparing special purpose financial statements without any legislative requirements
No requirement for preparation of statement of cash flows unless requested by the users.

For further information about Special Purpose Financial Statements, or other interpretations of the accounting standards, contact Carmen Ridley (cridley@afrs.com.au).

 

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Latest AASB Meeting Report Summary

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Provided by Carmen Ridley (www.afrs.com.au), AASB Board Member

The February AASB meeting was a one-day meeting only as the first day was an induction day for the five new board members.

Some of the relevant matters discussed were:

  • IFRS 9 – update on the status of the standard including the information that the complete standard is expected to be issued in the second quarter of 2014.
  • IASB comment letters – the AASB views on a number of pronouncements issued by the IASB and IPSASB were finalised for inclusion in comment letters.
  • Leasing and revenue – an update on these project was provided. Note that the IASB standard on revenue is expected to be issued in March / April 2014.

For further detail or information on any of these matters, refer to the AASB action alert available on www.aasb.gov.au or contact Carmen Ridley on cridley@afrs.com.au.

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Report on AASB Meeting 11 and 12 December

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

The AASB held their last meeting for 2013 on December 11 & 12. Carmen Ridley, Board Member and principal of Australian Financial Reporting Services, has provided a summary of the key points discussed most relevant to you:

Withdrawal of AASB 1031 Materiality – it was determined that AASB 1031 would be amended at this standard rather than immediately withdrawn – it will be reissued to refer to AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements and AASB 108 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors for guidance on materiality.  The references to AASB 1031 within the accounting standards will be progressively removed as each standard is amended for other consequential changes and once all standards have removed the AASB 1031 reference then this standard will be withdrawn. Note – the changes to AASB 1031 are not expected to change practice.

Hedge accounting – the IASB has released the hedge accounting chapter of IFRS 9 and at the AASB meeting, it was agreed that the Board members would vote on the Ballot Draft with the aim of releasing this on 20 December 2013 to be available for early adoption.  Many entities who have derivatives are considering early adoption since the onerous rules regarding hedge accounting in AASB 139 have been changed to remove the 80 – 125% effectiveness rules and to allow more risks to be hedge accounted.

Whilst the IASB has removed the mandatory effective date of IFRS 9, the AASB will include an effective date of 1 January 2017 within AASB 9 since without an effective date, a legislative instrument becomes immediately effective in the Australian legal system. This date is subject to review depending on the IASB effective date.  Note – the effective date needs to be updated in your standards issued not yet effective disclosures.

Superannuation entities – the long-awaited replacement standard for AAS 25 was approved for ballot draft which means that the Board members are required to vote on its release to the AASB website for a final fatal flaw review by interested stakeholders.  If you or your clients is a superannuation entity, i.e. An entity that constitutes one or more superannuation plan(s) or an approved deposit fund, then we strongly encourage you to review this which will should be available on the AASB website pre-Christmas.

Your voice The Board is looking to expand their database of stakeholders in a range of topics. If you are interested in being consulted / invited to roundtables on issues which are relevant to you, please contact Carmen on cridley@afrs.com.au. This may involve occasional phone calls / roundtable attendance to gain an appreciation of your practical experiences.

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How do I find the relevant accounting standard for the reporting period I am working on?

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Contributed by Carmen Ridley, AASB Board Member and Director, Australian Financial Reporting Systems (www.afrs.com.au).

The AASB website (www.aasb.gov.au) contains all the Australian Accounting Standards, however, the table of standards includes the existing standards and standards issued not yet effective.

If you are looking for the accounting standards that are applicable for a particular reporting period, then the quickest and easiest way to find them is the ‘search by reporting period’ function.

You can locate this function through the quick links menu on the AASB homepage. This allows you to enter your reporting period, and all Accounting Standards which are effective for that period will be displayed.

If you have questions about relevant accounting standards, then please contact Carmen Ridley on cridley@afrs.com.au

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AASB release the Investment Entities amendment to AASB 10

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

The Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) has issued AASB 2013-5 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Investment Entities.

These amendments  apply to investment entities, i.e. an entity that:

(a) obtains funds from one or more investors for the purpose of providing those investor(s) with investment management services;

(b) commits to its investor(s) that its business purpose is to invest funds solely for returns from capital appreciation, investment income, or both; and

(c) measures and evaluates the performance of substantially all of its investments on a fair value basis.

Examples of entities which might qualify as investment entities would include Australian superannuation entities, listed investment companies, pooled investment trusts and Federal, State and Territory fund management authorities.

The amendments in AASB 2013-5:

  1. provide an exception to consolidation to investment entities and require them to measure unconsolidated subsidiaries at fair value through profit or loss
  2. also introduce new disclosure requirements for investment entities that have subsidiaries.

Under AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements, reporting entities are required to consolidate all investees that they control (i.e. all subsidiaries). Preparers and users of financial statements of investment entities in Australia have commented that consolidating the subsidiaries of investment entities does not result in useful information for investors. Rather, reporting all investments, including investments in subsidiaries, at fair value, provides the most useful and relevant information. AASB 2013-5 is issued in response to these comments.

The amendments are effective from 1 January 2014 with early adoption permitted. It is expected that some entities will choose to early adopt this amendment from 31 December 2013, since AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements becomes effective on that date which introduces a different definition of control and may result in consolidation of different entities. Therefore the adoption of AASB 2013-5 will mean that entities do not consolidate their investments, however they will need to obtain fair values for their investments.

Please contact Carmen Ridley on 0438 029 867 if you require further information on the impact of this amending standard or whether your entity is able to apply the standard.

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AASB builds pressure for reform of disclosure and presentation requirements

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Publication of a series of ‘Essays’ commences (précis of AASB press release 14 August 2013)

The Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) Research Centre has published AASB Essay 2013-1Rethinking the Path from an Objective of Economic Decision Making to a Disclosure and Presentation Framework. Principally authored by AASB Chairman and CEO, Kevin M Stevenson, this essay is the first in a series designed to provide an avenue for a wide range of financial reporting issues to be discussed. Mr Stevenson also hopes that it will allow ideas to be raised to stimulate debate and provide thought leadership in accounting standard-setting.

Currently, there is considerable debate about the future of the conceptual framework used in setting accounting standards.  The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) is in the process of revising its conceptual framework (IASB Discussion Paper A Review of the IASB’s Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting is currently open for public comment), and the International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB) is developing its conceptual framework and it is in the context of these international works and projects that Mr Stevenson hopes his essay provokes commentary.

AASB Essay 2013-1 | Content Summary

Contends:

  • There is a gap in the conceptual framework that, if filled, would improve our ability to provide accounting responses to users’ needs, including through the development of a better, purpose-driven disclosure and presentation framework
  • There are a limited number of generic types of information, termed “stocks” and “flows” that characterise all types of entities to one degree or another.
  • The gap in the framework falls between the objective level and the lower levels. Both the objective and the stocks and flows identified are part of entities’ environments. The selections of qualitative characteristics, elements, measurement bases and presentation/disclosure approaches are seen as accounting responses aimed at satisfying users’ needs for information for decision making (the “objective”).
  • Specification of the relevant stocks and flows could also bring meaning to “financial position” and “performance” and potentially provide a way to define financial reporting, bounding it by the generic stocks and flows identified.

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